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Here's a guide to targeting in college football and the NFL | RSN

What is the rule on targeting in college football? The 2019 NCAA Rule Book defines targeting as when a player "takes aim at an opponent for purposes of attacking with forcible contact that goes beyond making a legal tackle or legal block or playing the ball." The NCAA targeting rule bans any forcible contact leading with the crown of the helmet or to the head or neck area of a defenseless player.

College football targeting rules: How NCAA defines targeting ...

Although these are not all the indicators of targeting, here are some defined by the NCAA rulebook: Launch — a player leaving his feet to attack an opponent by an upward and forward thrust of the body to make forcible... A crouch followed by an upward and forward thrust to attack with forcible ...

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What is the targeting rule in college football?

That's the language college football referees use when applying the targeting rule, which results in a 15-yard penalty and an ejection. For more NCAA football news, analysis, opinion and unique ...

College football targeting rules: A complete explanation ...

Targeting and Making Forcible Contact With the Crown of the Helmet (Rule 9-1-3) No player shall target and make forcible contact against an opponent with the crown of his helmet.

What is targeting? - Southeastern Conference

" 'Targeting' means that a player takes aim at an opponent for purposes of attacking with forcible contact that goes beyond making a legal tackle or a legal block or playing the ball." The targeting rule was developed as a player safety measure. Below is the definition of targeting taken directly from the 2019 NCAA Football Rule Book.

REPORT: The NCAA Might Change The Horrible Targeting Rule In ...

It sounds like the NCAA is ready to make some changes to the targeting rule. Right now, the targeting rule is out of control in college football, and if a player is flagged for it, they get ejected.

Does NCAA football need to revisit targeting rule? | Raleigh ...

NCAA coaches agree: College football targeting rules sometimes miss the mark Intent vs. impact. Every hit that’s labeled targeting isn’t intentional, and because of that, North Carolina coach Mack... ‘Happening so fast’. N.C. State safety Tanner Ingle knows the rule all too well. He was ejected ...

NFL targeting rule: What is it and some examples - SBNation.com

The biggest difference is that targeting in college football results in an automatic ejection and 15-yard penalty, while unnecessary roughness is just a 15-yard penalty in the NFL.